How to Search For a Job at a Startup (Go-Getters Only)

How to Search For a Job at a Startup (Go-Getters Only)

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been on the hunt for a position at a tech startup in Colorado. I’m just finishing up my business program at Praxis, and feel totally equipped to hit the job hunt running. Wondering how you can feel the same? Keep reading.


First, you need to know where to search. Do me a favor - never look at Craigslist again.


Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, here are a few good places to start.


Builtin.com

This has by far been my favorite place to hunt. If you want startup experience, and specifically want to work at a tech startup, this is the site for you. I’ve been looking at builtincolorado.com because I want to keep living in the Denver/Boulder area, but there are Built In websites for other tech hubs - Austin, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle. They allow you to filter jobs by role, benefits, tech stack, size of the company, and more.


Linkedin.com

Once you’ve revamped your profile, start using LinkedIn for more than just stalking old co-workers. Give the “Jobs” tab a click - you might be surprised what you can find. By updating your “Career Interests” in your profile, the “Jobs” section should automatically provide you with positions that you may be interested in. Also, by letting recruiters know you’re open to offers, you may snag a few unexpected interviews.


Indeed.com

I’m sure you’ve visited this site at one point or another, but you may have been searching incorrectly. Filtering by keywords is extremely important on this site, otherwise you’ll be swamped with cashier and canvassing positions. Since I’m trying to enter the tech startup world, I tried selecting my location (Boulder or Denver), and typing in the keywords “startup, $30,000”. This provided me with entry-level positions at startups (tech and non-tech alike). Since Boulder and Denver are tech hubs, however, most of the startups were technology oriented.

I played around with a few more keywords (certain types of roles I’m interested in) but tried to keep the options as open as possible to make sure I didn’t miss a hidden gem. This produced better results than simply typing in one job role in the keyword box, which is what I used to do (and what most still do today).



These three platforms should give you a great starting point, and may even be all you need to use. Being a go-getter is going to come in handy at this point - applying and interviewing. Check out this article on how to stand out in an endless sea of resumes.


And remember, enjoy the ride - you can carve your career into something you never thought possible.


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Trust the Process

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